Salmonella outbreak sickens people following multi-state egg recall

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At least 35 people have been infected with a salmonella outbreak tied to the recall of more than 206 million eggs, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports.

A salmonella outbreak that led to the multi-state recall in April of more than 200 million eggs has worsened in recent weeks, with the number of people sickened by the bacteria rising to nearly three dozen.

People in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida and Colorado were also affected. A total of 11 people were hospitalized in relation to the outbreak, with no fatalities reported so far. No deaths have been reported. Illnesses have been reported in all of the states, the majority of which were from NY and Virginia, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

Consumers who have purchased shells eggs are urged to immediately discontinue use of the recalled eggs and to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Salmonella is a bacteria that can be found on the inside of contaminated eggs and on eggshells, too. Since then, there have been 12 more cases added to the outbreak.

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The CDC is warning customers to avoid eggs produced by Rose Acre Farms, the company behind April's massive egg recall. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) investigators inspected the Hyde County, N.C., farm and collected samples for testing. Symptoms usually include diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps which set in about 12 to 72 hours after infection, and last four to seven days.

More than 200,000 eggs were recalled at that time.

There are differences in the Publix and Sunups egg cartons, which feature the P-1359D plant number and the Julian dates of 048A or 049A, with best dates of April 2 and April 3.

The recall is the largest since 2010, when a major salmonella outbreak tied to Iowa egg farms sickened more than 1,500 people, said Bill Marler, a Seattle-based personal injury attorney who focuses on food-borne illness litigation.

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