UN Chief raises concern over Rohingya crisis at ASEAN

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He says that "her association with our city shames us all and we should have no truck with it, even by default".

With Secretary of State Rex Tillerson arriving in Myanmar on Wednesday, the USA will look to engage the country's military leaders and Nobel Peace Prize victor Aung San Suu Kyi in addressing the violence against the Rohingya, according to the official, who asked not to be identified previewing Tillerson's visit.

More than 600,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled to Bangladesh since late August, driven out by a military counter-insurgency clearance operation in Buddhist-majority Myanmar's Rakhine State that a top United Nations official has described as a textbook case of "ethnic cleansing".

Tillerson condemned the attacks on Myanmar security forces.

The official did not comment on whether Tillerson would raise the threat of military sanctions, which U.S. lawmakers have pushed for. It cited an internal investigation that it said had absolved it of any wrongdoing in a crisis that has triggered Asia's largest refugee exodus in decades.

"I had an extended conversation with".

Suu Kyi has assured other Southeast Asian nations that her government is implementing the recommendations of a commission led by Annan on the situation in Rakhine state, where more than half a million Rohingya Muslims have fled to neighboring Bangladesh. Trudeau said he has deployed a special envoy to find out how Canada can support the Muslim minorities and pledged to support ASEAN efforts to help resolve the problem.

Many survivors in squalid camps inside Bangladesh - described as the world's worst refugee crisis - have reported mass killings, torture, and rape against Rohingya children, women, and men.

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The U.S. continues to weigh renewing sanctions on Myanmar as worldwide frustration over the country's treatment of its ethnic Rohingya minority rises, according to a senior State Department official.

The stream of desperate refugees who escape across the riverine border bring with them stories of rape, murder and the torching of villages by soldiers and Buddhist mobs.

The conversations in Myanmar could include consequences if the country's leaders can't formulate a "credible response" to the crisis that satisfies the worldwide community, the official said when asked if renewed sanctions were still under consideration.

However, it heavily restricts access to the region by independent journalists and aid groups, and verification of events on the ground is virtually impossible.

Roque said Suu Kyi did not refer to the Rohingya by name.

Musician and campaigner Bob Geldof on Monday slammed Suu Kyi as a "murderer" and a "handmaiden to genocide", becoming the latest in a growing line of global figures to disavow the one-time darling of the human rights community. The top USA diplomat will travel from Manila, where the summit of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) culminated on Tuesday.

"I can not hide my deep concern with the dramatic movement of hundreds of thousands of refugees from Myanmar to Bangladesh", Guterres told leaders including Suu Kyi.

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