Papa John's apologizes for comments made about National Football League players

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Papa John's CEO John Schnatter (middle), pictured with Archie Manning (left) and J.J.

That last sentence is in reference to a supremacist website saying the company is the official pizza of the alt-right after Schnatter made his comments.

The pizza chain used its Twitter page Tuesday to apologize to anyone who thought talk stemming from the company's quarterly conference call almost two weeks ago was meant to be divisive.

Even after the popular pizza chain issued an apology, several users on Twitter were not satisfied and said that it was too late to make an apology now. "That definitely was not our intention".

The pizza company was swiftly criticized by many for pressuring the league to suppress the player protests, which began as a way to bring attention to police brutality and racial injustice in America.

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Schnatter also blamed commissioner of the NFL Roger Goodell for allowing demonstrations to continue which he believes are turning football fans away from the games and those expensive pizza ads.

The protests have also drawn criticism from President Trump, who tweeted that kneeling players should be fired. "Leadership starts at the top, and this is an example of poor leadership".

"The NFL has hurt us by not resolving the current debacle to the players' and owners' satisfaction", Schnatter said in an earnings call on November 1, via Bloomberg.

"The NFL has hurt us", Schnatter said on the call. "I don't see an apology for that". The controversy kicked off after San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick took a knee during the national anthem a year ago, inspiring other players to engage in similar forms of protest to recognize racial inequality and police brutality.

Papa John's replied to some of the responses, acknowledging that it "should have acted sooner" following Schnatter's comments.

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